North Korea hotel shipwrecked in sea of Japan – more evidence against Pyongyang

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The titanium structure, reported to cost £35m, was built in Shanghai and intended to be towed overseas by the North Korean special forces.

Judging by the amount of time and effort involved in its construction, it seems to have taken a little longer than it should have.

The ship is known as the Yanggakdo Fortress-like Hotel and in its heyday, it was thought to have cost £35m to build.

While designed to withstand an attack by a nuclear missile, it is now a rusting hulk in the frozen waters of the Sea of Japan.

Judging by the amount of time and effort involved in its construction, it seems to have taken a little longer than it should have.

Stories emerged about the project in 2010 and the general consensus is that the hotel was never finished. It was eventually deemed unaffordable in North Korea and scraped towards the end of 2012, said John Bolton, a former US ambassador and current member of Trump’s national security council.

The website of Chicago-based Thor Equities, the original builder of the structure, said it was to be towed overseas by North Korean special forces for the tourist market. But the construction schedule and its setbacks meant that North Korea never delivered the futuristic structure.

Another former senior US diplomat, Zalmay Khalilzad, told ABC News that it was built to “extent that it was probably torpedoed and sunk”, meaning that it is now a “beast”.

If it was sunk intentionally or accidentally, the torpedo, or missile, that brought it down was planted by the North Koreans at a time when their leadership was worried about its collapsing economy and widening US military presence in the region.

Many experts have doubted whether the hotel was even built by the North Koreans, but its general appearance and placement lend credence to the idea. The landing point was in the port of Wonsan, a strategic area on the east coast.

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