How does the new ‘morning-after pill’ work?

For more than two decades, Boosters have provided millions of Americans with access to safe and effective medications, such as the daily pain reliever acetaminophen, the FDA’s first approved epilepsy drug, and the first over-the-counter prenatal vitamin to prevent birth defects.

Boosters are six-ounce containers that contain essential pain and other anti-inflammatory medications and are given to pregnant women by health care providers and many non-profit organizations. All of Boosters are labeled with signs that encourage their use safely and correctly, such as “safe for breastfeeding.”

Boosters have been available to all adults since 1996, but until now, only the weekly dosage of Tylenol has been sold in that form nationally. However, over the last year, a number of states have amended their laws to allow for each state to develop different different combinations of Boosters.

To allow for further access to safe and effective medications like Boosters during pregnancy, all ten pediatric advocacy groups that have always advocated for children to be able to obtain Tylenol and others products from retail pharmacies continue to fight for any further access to these drugs across the country.

The states that have amended their legislation to expand access to Boosters or other medications during pregnancy:

Alabama: Increases the number of Boosters authorized for general use and allows sales of a 96-count bag.

Alaska: Allows the sale of a 1-128-count Boosters bag.

California: Allows the sales of the 24-pack of Boosters.

Colorado: Allows the sale of a 100-count bag of Boosters.

Florida: Allows the sale of a 144-count bag of Boosters.

Georgia: Allows the sale of a 96-count bag of Boosters.

Hawaii: Allows the sale of a 1-128-count bag of Boosters.

Iowa: Allows the sale of a 1-128-count tub of Tylenol.

Kansas: Allows the sale of a 52-count bag of Tylenol.

Missouri: Allows the sale of a 99-count package of Tylenol.

New Hampshire: Allows the sale of a 96-count package of Tylenol.

New York: Allows the sale of a 96-count Bottles of Tylenol.

North Carolina: Allows the sale of a 96-count Tylenol bottle.

North Dakota: Allows the sale of a 24-pack of Tylenol.

Oregon: Allows the sale of a 1-128-count box of Tylenol.

Pennsylvania: Allows the sale of a 24-pack of Tylenol.

Rhode Island: Allows the sale of a 96-count 1-128-count bag of Tylenol.

Texas: Allows the sale of a 100-count bottle of Tylenol.

Vermont: Allows the sale of a 96-count 1-128-count pump of Tylenol.

Washington: Allows the sale of a 96-count 1-128-count Pump of Tylenol.

The National Pregnancy Advisory Council is the lobby group for the eight pediatric advocacy groups.

Under the original law, following the “private sector” model for implementing this legislation, state-licensed retail pharmacies were allowed to sell Boosters and other products during pregnancy in the same manner that they sold Naloxone, Trileptal, saline, Adeprin, or Cipro.

However, the approval of Tylenol sparked a separate Section of the law, requiring the federal government to set guidelines for packaging the morning-after pill in the state when it is available over-the-counter.

Under the president’s Agenda for Our Children, he in no way, shape or form pushes for the prohibition of federally licensed retailers from selling these product. Therefore, this provision should be amended in an appropriate fashion.

It is up to each state to decide if this formula would work in their specific situations and whatever bills are passed by their legislature should be approved by both the General Assembly and the Governor before they are signed into law.

Let’s all work together to make sure all adults can access a safe and effective medication during pregnancy.

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